Current Courses

Fall 2020

Spring 2020

Professional Organizations

  • Music Teachers National Association. Nationally Certified Teacher (NCTM). 01/01/2019 - 12/31/2019. Position : Member & Adjudicator.
  • Music Teachers National Association. Member and Nationally Certified Teacher (NCTM). 01/01/2018 - 12/31/2018. Position : Member and adjudicator.
  • National Federation of Music Clubs. 01/01/2018 - 12/31/2018. Position : Member and adjudicator.
  • Music Teachers National Association. Member and Nationally Certified Teacher (NCTM). 01/01/2017 - 12/31/2017. Position : Member and adjudicator.
  • National Federation of Music Clubs. 01/01/2017 - 12/31/2017. Position : Member and adjudicator.
  • Music Teachers National Association. 01/01/2016 - 12/31/2016. Position : Member and Nationally Certified Teacher (NCTM).

Teaching Philosophy

As an undergraduate music theory and musicianship instructor, I conceptualize musical

learning from the student's perspective as the gaining of a set of practical and useful

musical skills. From this vantage point it becomes clear to me that my job as an

instructor to freshmen and sophomores is to not only teach skills that are relevant and

meaningful, but also to continually point out that these basic skills are universally

important across the spectrum of all different types of musical occupations that they

may choose to pursue. I have learned that my students have better knowledge

retention rates when I structure my theory classes to have a reasonable amount of

teacher lecturing with more student participation and interaction. My goal for my

undergraduate students is to teach them how to develop their critical thinking and

problem-solving skills. I want them to know how music is organized and composed,

from the smallest of elements up to large-scale forms. I especially want them to

understand why this knowledge is critical to their own performance and teaching, and

so in my lectures I always link this directly to how it can help them in their own live

performances.

 

With the doctoral students, my role in the teaching and learning process is somewhat

different. These students are already experienced performers and scholars, and several

of them are already working professionally as music professors at other institutions

while finishing their doctoral degree program at the U. of U. Nearly all of them would

like to pursue a career in academia and/or performing. With this in mind, every

semester I provide each student with several opportunities to lead the class in a

discussion of an assigned topic. The final project for the semester requires them to

present a 30-minute polished lecture/performance in front of their peers. They also

must write a very substantial research paper as part of this final project. My goal in the

assigning this final assignment (performance + research paper) is specifically geared to

help DMA students prepare to write their doctoral theses and present their final DMA

lecture recital.

 

In order to achieve these goals, I use a very interactive pedagogical teaching approach

in all of my classes, particularly in the Aural Skills and Musicianship courses. I make it a

priority to foster a safe and supportive learning environment, a place where students

feel free to ask questions and offer their opinions. I use the "flipped" classroom

approach to teaching and learning in my MUSC 3540 (Form and Analysis) and MUSC

7210/11 (Doctoral Performance Practice) classes. This technique requires that students

complete reading assignments before coming to class, thus reducing the amount of

lecturing. It also frees up more time for critical thinking, in-depth class discussion, and

hands-on activities.

Courses I Teach

  • MUSC 1110 - Music Theory I
    The course begins with a brief review of fundamentals and then moves on to species counterpoint (1st - and 2nd-species), basic four-part writing, and an introduction to tonal syntax.
  • MUSC 1120 - Music Theory II
    The course begins with a study of the remaining species of counterpoint (3rd-, 4th- & mixed-species). It then moves on to the study of traditional diatonic harmony through four-part writing using figured bass, unfigured bass, melody harmonization and model composition. The course also includes analysis of excerpts from the music literature of the 18th and 19th centuries.
  • MUSC 1130 - Musicianship I
    This aural-skills course provides further development of sight-singing and dictation skills. The content of this course is coordinated with the material introduced in Music Theory I (Musc. 1110)
  • MUSC 1140 - Musicianship II
    This aural-skills course provides further development of sight-singing and dictation skills. The content of this course is coordinated with the material introduced in Music Theory II (MUSC 1120).
  • MUSC 2130 - Musicianship III
    This aural-skills course provides intensive development of chromatic sight-singing and dictation skills. The content of this course is coordinated with the material introduced in Music Theory III (MUSC 2110).
  • MUSC 2140 - Musicianship IV
    This aural-skills course provides further development & practice of sight-singing and diction skills. There are also exercises in hearing form to complement the material presented in Form & Analysis (MUSC 3540).
  • MUSC 3540 - Form and Analysis
    The course provides an introduction to the common musical forms of 18th- & 19th-century literature. Topics include small musical structures such as sentences & various periods, and larger structure such as binary forms, variations, rondo, ternary forms & sonata form. The course also introduces methods for representing musical forms such as formal diagrams and hierarchical outlines.
  • MUSC 7210 - Doctoral Performance Practice I
    Study of sources and materials specific to performance practices in music prior to 1750.
  • MUSC 7211 - Doctoral Performance Practice II
    Study of sources and materials specific to performance practices in music from 1750-1900.

Teaching Projects

  • Performance Practice Videos for MUSC 7210/11 Doctoral Seminar & for MTNA. Project Lead: Dr. Pamela Jones. 07/02/2018 - 08/24/2018. Total Budget: $0.00.
  • Dee Grant: Dr. Kenneth Drake, Fortepianist & Beethoven Scholar, with Jun-Hee Han. Project Lead: Dr. Pamela Jones. Dee Grant 03/01/2018 - 03/30/2019. Total Budget: $4,744.40.

Small Group Teaching

  • Early Music Ensemble Harpsichord Instructor (solo and continuo training). My small group consisted of three students for Spring 2019 and four students for Fall 2019 Semester, including graduate student Yuhuan Xu and several undergraduate students. We alternated one-on-one lessons with small group teaching for this course, 2 hours per Week.   08/19/2019  -  12/06/2019