LAZARUS ADUA portrait
  • Assistant Professor, Sociology Department
801-581-6153

Publications

  • Lazarus Adua & Linda Lobao (2020). The Political-Economy of Local Land-Use Policy: Place-Making and the Relative Power of Business, Civil Society, and Government. The Sociological Quarterly. Accepted, 02/29/2020.
  • Chien-fei Chen & Yu Wang, Lazarus Adua, Hua Bai (2019). Reducing Household Fossil Fuel Consumption by Enabling Technology and Behavior. Energy Research and Social Science. Accepted, 12/06/2019.
  • Lazarus Adua, Brett Clark, Richard York & Chien-fei Chen (2019). Modernizing Our Way Out or Digging Ourselves In? Reconsidering the Impacts of Efficiency Innovations and Affluence on Residential Energy Consumption, 2005-2015. Journal of Environmental Managment. Accepted, 09/29/2019.
  • Lazarus Adua (2019). Reviewing the complexity of energy behavior: Technologies, analytical traditions, and household energy consumption data in the United States. Energy Research and Social Science. Accepted, 09/05/2019.
  • Adua, Lazarus & Lobao, Linda (2019). The Growth Machine across the United States: Business Actors’ Influence on Communities’ Economic Development and Limited-Government Austerity Policies. City & Community Journal. Vol. 18(2), 20. Published, 06/19/2019.
  • Lazarus Adua & Brett Clark (2019). Even for the Environment, Context Matters! States, Households, and Residential Energy Consumption. Environmental Research Letter. Vol. 14. Published, 05/31/2019.
    https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-93...
  • Adua, Lazarus & Ashley Beaird (2018). Place-based Inequality in “Energetic” Pain: The Price of Residence in Rural America. Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World. Published, 10/22/2018.
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/23780...
  • Adua, Lazarus & Richard York; Beth-Anne Schuelke-Leech (2016). The Human Dimensions of Climate Change: A Micro-Level Assessment of Views from the Ecological Modernization, Political Economy and Human Ecology Perspectives. Social Science Research. Vol. 56, 18. Published, 01/01/2016.
  • Adua, Lazarus & Lobao, Linda (2015). Business Attraction and Redistribution by U.S. Local Governments: To What Extent is there a Zero-Sum Relationship between Business and Citizens’ Interests. State and Local Government Review. 17. Published, 12/31/2015.
  • Lobao, Linda & Lazarus Adua and Gregory Hooks (2014). Privatization, Business Attraction, and Social Services across the United States: Local Governments’ Use of Market-Oriented, Neoliberal Policies in the Post 2000 Period. Social Problems. Published, 11/30/2014.
  • Adua, Lazarus (2011). The Ecological Modernization Reader: Environmental Reform in Theory and Practice. Rural Sociology. Published, 12/30/2011.
  • Lobao, Linda & Lazarus Adua (2011). State-Rescaling and Local Governments' Austerity Policies across the United States, 2001-2008. Cambridge Journal Regions, Economy and Society. Published, 07/31/2011.
  • Adua, Lazarus & Jeff S. Sharp (2011). Explaining Residential Energy Consumption: A Focus on Location and Race Differences in Natural Gas Use. Journal of Rural Social Sciences. Published, 01/31/2011.
  • Adua, Lazarus (2010). Adua, Lazarus. 2010. “To Cool a Sweltering Earth: Does Energy Efficiency Improvement Offset the Climate Impacts of Lifestyle?. Energy Policy. Published, 10/31/2010.
  • Adua, Lazarus & Jeff S. Sharp (2010). Examining Survey Participation and Response Quality: The Significance of Topic Salience and Incentives. Survey Methodology. Published, 06/30/2010.
  • Sharp, Jeff S. & Lazarus Adua (2009). The Social Basis of Agro-Environmental Concern: Physical versus Social Proximity. Rural Sociology. Published, 01/30/2009.
  • Adua, Lazarus (2008). Alternative Energy: Political, Economic, and Social Feasibility. Rural Sociology. Published, 12/31/2008.
  • Adua, Lazarus (2007). Equatorial Guinea. Berkshire Publishing Group. Published, 06/30/2007.

Research Statement

Research Statement

Lazarus Adua, PhD.

Assistant Professor of Sociology

 

Introduction

My research interest and focus spans several areas in environmental sociology and political economy/development sociology.  In the field of environmental sociology, my current work focuses on: 1) factors influencing energy consumption, a major driver of CO2 emissions, at the household and state levels; 2) energy access and inequality in the United States; and 3) the environmental consequences of political-ideological views as well as other general environmental views.  In relation to the area of political economy/development sociology, my work currently focuses on U.S. localities’ social and developmental policies, including environmentally significant policy decisions.

Environmental Sociology

In relation to my first area of focus in environmental sociology, I have examined the comparative impacts of lifestyles, behavior, and efficiency technologies on residential energy consumption, a major driver of CO2 emissions. As an illustration, one of my most recent projects, “Reviewing the Complexity of Energy Behavior: Technologies, Analytical Traditions, and Household Energy Consumption Data in the United States,” examined the comparative impacts of energy-related behavioral actions and various residential energy efficiency technologies on energy consumption. It was published in a high impact social science journal (IF=5.525), Energy Research and Social Science, (Volume 59, January 2020, 101289). A second example is my 2019 paper titled, “Even for the Environment, Context Matters! States, Households, and Residential Energy Consumption,” which was also published in a high impact journal, Environmental Research Letters (Volume 14, 2019, 064008). I am currently working on two research projects examining the drivers of CO2 emissions and energy consumption at the U.S. state level.

I have had ongoing research interest in the area of energy access and inequality in the United States. As an example, I recently published a paper titled, “Place-based Inequality in ‘Energetic’ Pain: The Price of Residence in Rural America” in Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World (Volume 4, 2018). The paper investigated rural-urban differences in energy burdens (as measured by energy expenditures in the residential sector). My most recent work in this area, titled “Differentiated Disadvantage! The Intersectionality of Class, Race, Gender, and Residential Energy-Efficiency Inequality in the United States,” is currently under review by Sociological Forum. I have also commenced work using panel data to examine energy burden and insecurity in the United States.    

As already broached above, my third area of work focuses on environmental consequences of political-ideological views and other attitudes more generally. One of my research papers in this area, forthcoming in Review of Policy Research is titled, “Politics and Corporate-Sector Environmentally Significant Actions: The Effects of Political Partisanship on U.S. Utilities Energy Efficiency Policies.” The paper assesses the direct, indirect, and total impacts of political partisanship on state-level utilities’ investment in energy efficiency, a tool widely used for environmental management. A second similar paper, titled, “U.S. States Initiation of Energy Efficiency Policies in the Era of Climate Change: Throwing a Searchlight on the Influence of Political Partisanship and Ideology,” is currently under review by Environmental Science and Policy. It examines how political partisanship influences state governments adoption of energy efficiency policies. I have previously published on how familial connections to agriculture and the physical landscape influences attitudes about the environment.  

Political Economy/Development Sociology

I also conduct research germane to the area of political economy/development sociology. My research in this area has focused on local governments’ social, developmental, and environmental policies. I have published several papers in this area, with my most recent one published in the journal of City and Community. It is titled, “The Growth Machine across the United States: Business Actors’ Influence on Communities’ Economic Development and Limited-Government Austerity Policies.” One of my older publications in this area is titled. “Business Attraction and Redistribution by U.S. Local Governments: To What Extent is there a Zero-Sum Relationship between Business and Citizens’ Interests,” and was published in State and Local Government Review, 2015. As the title suggests, it examined the extent to which local government are apt to prioritize the interest of business over citizens’ interest in social service, drawing on the neoliberal governance literature. 

While my past work in this area has focused mostly on social and developmental policies, I have initiated new work on local governments’ environmentally significant decisions, using the empirical case of U.S. counties. One of these is a paper forthcoming in The Sociological Quarterly, titled, “The Political-Economy of Local Land-Use Policy: Place-Making and the Relative Power of Business, Civil Society, and Government.” It draws on sociology’s growth machine theory to examine the relative impacts of business actors, civil society, and local governments’ attributes on local land-use policy. Another example is a manuscript examining the causal links between the growth machine (i.e., a coalition of local power actors, such as landowners, builders, real estate developers, and local businesses and utilities) and county governments’ land-use policies and decisions. This paper, titled, “Place-making across the U.S.: Local development, land-use policies, and the effects of the growth machine” is ready for submission to Society and Natural Resources for review. Another project, still at the embryonic stage, examines the causal links between the growth machine, localities economic development initiatives, and outdoor air quality in the United States.  

 Conclusion

As demonstrated above, my academic research agenda is very much consistent with part of the Department of Sociology’s current focus and the broader sociological interest in environmental studies and development. It focuses on the social drivers of environmental problems, energy-related inequality, and the impacts of political economic factors, including neoliberal development, on local social and developmental policy. My work has been published in good peer-reviewed journals and presented at professional conferences, locally and abroad.      

 

Research Keywords

  • The growth machine
  • Social Policy/ Welfare States
  • Local Government
  • Environmental attitudes and concerns
  • Energy Efficiency
  • Energy
  • Development policies
  • Climate Change