Adam Bress portrait
  • Assistant Professor, Population Health Sciences

Education

  • Pharm.D., Pharmacy, University of Maryland
  • Residency, Pharmacy Practice, Yale-New Haven Hospital
  • Residency, Cardiology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • M.S., Clinical and Translational Science, University of Illinois at Chicago. Project: Pharmacogenomics of Heart Failure in African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans
  • Research Fellowship, Cardiovascular Pharmacogenomics, University of Illinois at Chicago

Biography

Dr. Bress received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Maryland, and his Masters of Science in Clinical and Translational Science from the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health with a focus on epidemiology. He completed his residency in pharmacy practice at Yale-New Haven Hospital and Cardiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He subsequently completed his post-doctoral research fellowship in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Bress is currently Assistant Professor of Population Health Sciences in the Division of Health System Innovation and Research and an Investigator at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System. 

Dr. Bress is a cardiovascular clinical pharmacist and population scientist with broad interests in cardiovascular disease epidemiology with a focus on the way we measure and treat high blood pressure. His research uses pharmacoepidemiology (drug effects in populations) and pharmacogenetics (genetic causes of variable drug effects) and aims to understand the complex issues surrounding race/ethnicity, genetic ancestry, and racial/ethnic differences in medication responses and outcomes. He is particularly interested in how genetic ancestry can be used to learn more about the multi-factorial causes of racial/ethnic differences in medication responses and health outcomes. After coming to the Universtiy of Utah, he received an NIH career development award investigating genetic and environmental causes of racial/ethnic differences in blood pressure medication responses and cardiovascular disease events.