Publications

  • Morgan (date unknown). Morgan, C.L., & Sansone, C. (2009). Intrinsic motivation. Encyclopedia of Counseling Psychology. Sage.. Accepted, .
  • Carol Sansone (date unknown). Sansone, C., Thoman, D., & Fraughton, T. (2015). The relation between interest and self-regulation in mathematics and science. In Renninger, K.A., Nieswandt, M., & Hidi, S. Interest in K-16 Mathematics and Science Learning (pp. 111-132). American Educational Research Association.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C. (2009). What’s interest got to do with it?: Potential trade-offs in the self-regulation of motivation. In J. Forgas, R. Baumeister, and D. Tice (Eds.). The psychology of self-regulation: Cognitive,affective, and motivational processes [The 11th Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology] (pp. 35-51). New York: Psychology Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., Thoman, D.B., & Smith, J.L. (2010). Interest and self-regulation: Understanding individual variability in choices, efforts and persistence over time. In R.Hoyle (Ed.) Handbook of Personality and Self-Regulation (pp. 191-217). Wiley-Blackwell.. Accepted, .
  • Carol Sansone (date unknown). Self-regulation of motivation: A renewable resource for learning.. (pp. 87-110). Cambridge University Press. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Renninger, K. A., Sansone, C., & Smith, J. L., (2004). Love of learning. In C. Peterson & M. E. P. Seligman (Eds.) Character strengths and virtues: A classification and handbook. New York: Oxford University Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., Morf, C. C., & Panter, A.T. (2004). The research process: Of big pictures, little details, and the social psychological road in between. In C. Sansone, C.C. Morf and A.T. Panter (Eds.), The Sage Handbook of Methods in Social Psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Smith, J.L., Morgan, C.L., & Sansone, C., (2001). Getting (inter) personal: The role of other people in the self-regulation of interest. In F. Columbus (Ed.), Advances in Psychology Research. New York: Nova Science.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J.M., & Sansone, C. (2000). Rewarding competence: The importance of goals in the study of intrinsic motivation. In C. Sansone and J.M. Harackiewicz (Eds.), Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Smith, J. (2000). Interest and self-regulation: The relation between having to and wanting to. In C. Sansone and J.M. Harackiewicz (Eds.), Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance (pp. 341-372). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Harackiewicz, J.M. (2000). Looking beyond rewards: The problem and promise of intrinsic motivation. In C. Sansone and J.M. Harackiewicz (Eds.), Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Harackiewicz, J.M. (2000). Controversies and new directions: Is it déjà vu all over again? In C. Sansone and J.M. Harackiewicz (Eds.), Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Berg, C.A., Strough, J., Calderone, K., Meegan, S.P., & Sansone, C. (1997). Planning to prevent everyday problems from occurring. In S.L. Friedman & E.K. Scholnick (Eds.), Why, how, and when do we plan? The developmental psychology of planning (pp. 209-236). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Harackiewicz, J.M. (1996). I don't feel like it: The function of interest in self-regulation. In L. Martin & A. Tesser (eds.), Striving and feeling: The interaction of goals and affect. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J. M., Manderlink, G., & Sansone, C. (1992). Competence processes and achievement motivation: Implications for intrinsic motivation. In A. K. Boggiano & T. S. Pittman (Eds.), Achievement and motivation: A social developmental perspective. Cambridge Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J. M., & Sansone, C. (1991). Goals and intrinsic motivation: You can get there from here. In P. R. Pintrich & M. L. Maehr (Eds.), Advances in Motivation and Achievement (vol. 7): Goals and self-regulatory processes (pp. 21-49). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., Morf, C.C., & Panter, A.T. (Eds.). The Sage Handbook of Methods in Social Psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Harackiewicz, J.M (Eds.). Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation: The Search for Optimal Motivation and Performance. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. Accepted, .
  • Thoman, D.B (date unknown). Social influences of interest: Conceptualizing group differences in education through a self-regulation of motivation model. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations. Vol. 22, 330-355. Accepted, .
  • David Funder (date unknown). Funder, D.C., Levine, J.M., Mackie, D.M., Morf, C.C., Sansone, C., Vazire, S., & West, S.G. (2014). Improving the dependability of research in personality and social psychology. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 18 (1), 3-12. (published online before print Nov. 8, 2013, doi: 10.1177/1088868313507536). Accepted, .
  • Thoman (date unknown). Thoman, D., Sansone, C., Fraughton, T., & Pasupathi, M. (2012). How students (socially) evaluate interest: The role of unresponsive peers in the evaluation and maintenance of interest. Contemporary Educational Psychology; 37(4), 254–265. Accepted, .
  • Geerling, D. (date unknown). The dynamic association between interest and confusion: The potential for moderation by utility value and gender. Journal of Experimental Education. Vol. 88, 407-430. Accepted, .
  • Thoman, D.B. (date unknown). Implicit theories of interest regulation. Motivation Science. Vol. 6, 321-334. Accepted, .
  • Sansone (date unknown). Sansone, C.; Fraughton, T.; Zachary, J.; Butner, J.; Heiner, C. (2011). Self-regulation of motivation when learning online: The importance of who, why and how. Educational Technology Research and Development, 59 (2), 199-212. (special issue on Motivation and New Media). Accepted, .
  • Sansone, C. (date unknown). Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and Self-Determination Theory. Motivation Science. Vol. 7. Accepted, .
  • Sansone (date unknown). Sansone, C., Smith, J.L., Thoman, D., & MacNamara, A. (2012). Regulating goals-defined and experience-defined motivation when learning online: Motivation and performance tradeoffs. The Internet and Higher Education, 15 (3), 141-149. (special issue on Emotion in Online Learning Environments). Accepted, .
  • Fraughton (date unknown). Fraughton, T., Sansone, C., Butner, J., Zachary, J. (2011). Interest and performance when learning online: Providing utility value information can be important for both novice and experienced students. International Journal of Cyber Behavior, Psychology and Learning, 1(2), 1-15. Accepted, .
  • Dustin Thoman (date unknown). Thoman, D. B., & Sansone, C. (2016). Gender bias triggers diverging science interests between women and men: The role of activity interest appraisals. Motivation and Emotion, 1-14. DOI: 10.1007/s11031-016-9550-1. Accepted, .
  • Sansone (date unknown). Sansone, C., Fraughton, T., Butner, J., & Zachary, J. (revision under review). Regulating motivation and performance when learning online: Interested engagement can hurt and help. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Werner, C.M., Sansone, C., & Brown, B.B. (2008). Guided group discussion and attitude change: The roles of normative and informational influence. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 28, 27-41. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Thoman, D.B., Sansone, C., & Pasupathi, M. (2007). Talking about interest: Exploring the role of social interaction for regulating motivation and the interest experience. Journal of Happiness Studies, 8, 335-370. (special issue). Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Smith, J.L., Sansone, C., & White, P.H. (2007). The Stereotyped Task Engagement Process: The role of interest and achievement motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 99, 99-114. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Thoman, D.B. (2006). Maintaining activity engagement: Individual differences in the process of self-regulating motivation. Journal of Personality, 74, 1697-1720. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Thoman, D.B. (2005). Does what I feel affect what I learn?: Current answers and new questions. Learning and Instruction (special issue on “Feelings and Emotions in the Learning Process.”). Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Thoman, D.B. (2005). Interest as the missing motivator in self-regulation. European Psychologist, 10, 175-186. (special section on “Motivation and Affect in the Self-Regulation of Behavior.”). Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Werner, C. M., Byerly, S., & Sansone, C. (2004). Changing intentions to use toxic household products through guided group discussion. In B. Martens & A. Keul (Eds.), Special Issue 18th IAPS Conference. Evaluating for Innovation: Social Design of Sustainable Places [Special Issue]. Revista psihologie aplicata, 6(3-4), (Journal of Applied Psychology), 147-156. Editura Universitatii de Vest: Vienne. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., Rodriguez, W., Nakatani, K., Wynekoop, J., Boggs, R., & Fornaciari, C.J. (2002). Best practices for motivating students in e-courses. AASA (American Association of School Administrators) Professor. [Invited for special issue on online learning.]. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Morgan, C.L., Isaac, J., & Sansone, C. (2001). The role of interest in understanding the career choices of female and male college students. Sex Roles, 44, 295-320. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Smith, J.L. (2000). The “how” of goal pursuit: Interest and self-regulation. Psychological Inquiry, 306-309. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Isaac, J.D., Sansone, C., & Smith, J. (1999). Other people as a source of interest in an activity. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 35, 239-265. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., Wiebe, D.J., & Morgan, C.L. (1999). Self-regulating motivation: The moderating role of hardiness and conscientiousness. Journal of Personality, 67, 701-733. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Berg, C.A., Strough, J., Calderone, K.S., Sansone, C., & Weir, C. (1998). The role of problem definition in understanding age and context effects on strategies for solving everyday problems. Psychology and Aging, 13, 29-44. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Harackiewicz, J.M. (1998). “Reality” is complicated. American Psychologist, 53, 673-674. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Strough, J., Berg, C., & Sansone, C. (1996). Goals for solving everyday problems across the life span: Age and gender differences in the salience of interpersonal concerns. Developmental Psychology, 32, 1106-1115. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Berg, C. A. (1993). Adapting to the environment across the life span: Different process or different inputs? International Journal of Behavioral Development, 16, 379-390. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., & Morgan, C. (1992). Intrinsic motivation and education: Competence in context. Motivation and Emotion, 16, 249-270. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C. Weir, C., Harpster, L., & Morgan, C. (1992). Once a boring task always a boring task?: Interest as a self-regulatory mechanism. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 379-390. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sanbonmatsu, D. M., Kardes, F. R., & Sansone, C. (1991). Remembering less and inferring more: Effects of time of judgment on inferences about unknown attributes. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61, 546-554. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Rhodewalt, F., Sansone, C., Hill, C. A., Chemers, M. M., &Wysocki, J. (1991). Stress and distr¬ess as a function of Jenkins Activity Survey-defined Type A behavior and control over the work environ¬ment. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 12, 211-226. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C. (1989). Competence feedback, task feedback, and intrinsic interest: An examination of process and context. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 25, 343-361. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C., Sachau, D. A., & Weir, C. (1989). Effects of instruction on intrinsic interest: The importance of context. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57, 819-829. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J. M., Blair, L. W., Sansone, C., Epstein, J.A., & Stuchell, R.N. (1988). Nicotine gum and self-help manuals in smoking cessation: An evaluation in a medical context. Addictive Behaviors, 13, 319-330. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Rhodewalt, F., Strube, M. J., Hill, C. A., & Sansone, C. (1988). Strategic self-attribution and Type behavior. Journal of Research in Personality, 22, 60-74. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J. M., Sansone, C., Blair, L. W., Epstein, J.A., & Manderlink, G. (1987). Attributional processes in behavior change and maintenance: Smoking cessation and continued abstinence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 372-378. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C. (1986). A question of competence: The effects of competence and task feedback on intrinsic interest. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51, 918-931. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J. M., Sansone, C., & Manderlink, G. (1985). Competence, achievement orientation, and intrinsic motivation: A process analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 48, 493-508. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Harackiewicz, J. M., Manderlink, G., & Sansone, C. (1984). Rewarding pinball wizardry: The effects of evaluation and cue value on intrinsic interest. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 47, 287-300. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Jones, W. H., Sansone, C., and Helm, B. (1983). Loneliness and interpersonal judgments. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 9, 437-441. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C. (1999). Introductory comments. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 35, 205-208. Accepted, .
  • (date unknown). Sansone, C. (Ed.). “Intrinsic motivation, performance, and creativity: New perspectives on old questions.” Special Issue of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Accepted, .

Research Statement

Research Statement

Here I briefly describe the conceptual framework we have developed (and continue to develop), and then the more recent areas of applications in which we have been examining the implications of the model (noting work that is ongoing and new directions).

Conceptual framework. Students’ ability to maintain motivation while learning science and math is critical to mastering material beyond the elementary level, and persisting in the field. It requires not only keeping one’s “eye on the prize”, but on experiencing interest during the process. However, formal educational curricula typically dictate the types and sequences of materials that must be learned regardless of how interesting a particular student might find that material.  Thus, to persist, students must be able to maintain their motivation even when they do not find the experience interesting. Students are typically encouraged to engage in strategies that (re)emphasize the importance of persistence and likelihood of success, but this may not be enough to counter the pull of more interesting choices.  However, students can also engage in strategies that make the experience more interesting, and they are more likely to do so when motivated to persist. Thus, students do not just regulate their experience in order to feel better; they do so in order to maintain motivation to reach their goals.  We have developed the Self-Regulation of Motivation model (Sansone & Smith, 2000; Sansone & Thoman, 2005) to capture this conceptual framework, which outlines how the experience of interest is embedded within the overall process of regulating motivation and behavior. The model synthesizes research detailing how goal-striving affects the experience of interest, along with research on whether and how individuals regulate the interest experience. The model also illustrates how the relationship between regulating interest and performance might result in trade-offs, particularly in the short term (e.g., time spent on something that makes learning more interesting might come at a cost to time spent on completing required tasks). The degree to which short-term trade-offs are acknowledged and accepted may, in turn, determine whether students persist in the long-term. By exploring how the experience of interest and its regulation works within the overall process of self-regulation, the model suggests ways that educators and the educational context could unintentionally hinder interest regulation, as well as places where they could foster successful regulation. In 2012, we were invited to a special conference on Interest and K-16 Mathematics and Science Learning (PIs: Renninger & Nieswandt) funded by the American Educational Research Association to present the model and implications for education, and a chapter appears in the edited book based on that conference (Sansone, Thoman & Fraughton, 2015). We have also been asked to review the model and the research that has been directed by that model in two other recent edited volumes (Thoman, Sansone & Geerling, 2017; Sansone, Geerling, Thoman, & Smith, 2019). A recent paper explores the application of this model for understanding group differences (e.g., students from underrepresented versus majority backgrounds) in motivational challenges and processes (Thoman, et al., 2019)

Research applications

Online learning. When learning takes place “online” via the Internet, students are primarily responsible for regulating their own patterns of engagement with learning activities (Allen & Seaman, 2007; Artino & Stephens, 2009). As a result, relative to traditional classrooms, online learning can allow the construction of individualized learning contexts. However, online learning also can be associated with greater challenges to self-regulation (e.g., by not providing structure for effective time management or by providing easy access to temptations), allowing for trade-offs to more easily appear. For example, Sansone, Smith, Thoman, and MacNamara (2012) found that undergraduates in an online section of an upper-division psychology course were more likely than students in the on-campus section to report trying to make studying for an exam more enjoyable by exploring material on the class Web page. The more students in the online section reported using this strategy, however, the greater their interest but the poorer their exam performance.

Although suggestive, the results of Sansone et al.’s (2012) study were correlational in nature, and thus could not address the causal paths suggested by the theoretical framework. The purpose of our NSF-funded program of research was to examine the implications of the SRM model in the context of online learning.  We thus developed a hybrid paradigm that provided many of the controls that are part of an experimental paradigm, but that also allowed students the time and freedom to work through online lessons as they would in a class (e.g., Sansone, Fraughton, Zachary, Butner, & Heiner, 2011).

Using this paradigm, we could test multiple hypotheses generated from the SRM model. For example, Sansone, et al. (2011) showed that when provided with information about the usefulness of learning HTML (e.g., they would be able to enhance personal or organizational webpages; collect information from customers; etc.), students displayed a greater degree of exploration and experimentation with sample codes during the lesson. Greater exploratory engagement during the lesson predicted higher interest at the end of the session, which in turn predicted requests for the access code to the entire online class. Greater engagement during the lesson also tended to predict higher quiz scores. However, the results also reflected the possibility of trade-offs found previously in more controlled experimental settings (Sansone, Wiebe & Morgan, 1999). That is, about 20% of the participants received a zero score on the assignment because they failed to submit the assignment before the session ended, and this failure was predicted by greater exploration and experimentation during the lesson. These findings are described in a draft that will be submitted this semester (Sansone, Fraughton, Sinclair, Butner, & Zachary, in preparation).

In a follow-up study, we collected similar data within the context of two semester-long online computer science courses. In addition to the measures used in the laboratory paradigm, we added assessments of what students were feeling “in the moment” by programming pop-up questionnaires into the class server. These questionnaires appeared either at random intervals while the student was logged into the class (i.e., experience-sampling), or when the student chose to engage with class examples and exercises (i.e., event-sampling; these ‘events’ mapped onto similar engagement measures used in the laboratory paradigm). Using this methodology, we were able to track how students’ interest levels changed over time, both in general and also while students were known to be actively engaged with the course materials of their choosing. A recent paper using these data employed a dynamic systems approach to examine how feelings of interest and confusion covaried over time (Geerling, et al., 2019), identifying potential gender differences.

Together, findings from research in the context of online learning suggest that students’ actions during the learning process over time are critical for whether interest is maintained, and there is evidence that students engage in these actions in circumstances consistent with the SRM model. There is also evidence that these actions may result in performance trade-offs, as assessed by exam grades or submitting an assignment in time. Utilizing an online learning paradigm has thus given us a better sense of the ways in which students can use course materials to regulate their own interest experiences and maintain motivation over time. We anticipate that additional papers will be generated from the overall NSF-funded project.

More recently, we have worked with the Psychology Department to use some of the things we have learned and methods we have developed to help assess the online offerings of classes re-developed as part of the Online Initiative (funds for which we applied for when I was chair). I am currently leading an effort to identify whether the shift to various implementations of online learning during Fall Semester, 2020, were differentially associated with problems in engagement and motivation. With the support of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, we (myself and two graduate students, Yun Tang and Jasmine Norman) implemented repeated surveys across the semester in courses offered in two departments in the college. These courses differed in whether they were developed to be offered asynchronously online, initially scheduled to be in person but shifted to interactive video formats online, or were a “hybrid” version of alternating in person and online formats. We are currently analyzing the data for feedback to the college. We hope to be able to use these data for research purposes in future, but the immediate focus is providing insights into students’ educational experiences during the Covid19 pandemic which can be used by the university community.

Meta-motivational beliefs. In a recent direction we have started to examine how individuals’ beliefs about interest regulation may influence their own regulation processes. For example, Thoman, Sansone, Robinson and Helm (2020) proposed that students would only regulate interest if they believed that interest could be regulated, and that students would not actively regulate their interest if they believed that the experience of interest was stable (and unchangeable). In one of their studies, college students’ theories about the malleability of interest (versus fixed nature of interest) was assessed via an adaption of Dweck, Chiu, and Hong’s (1995) measure of implicit theory of intelligence. Student were also asked if they could recall any recent boring assignments from their actual classes, and if so, whether they used any interest-enhancing strategies when completing the assignment(s) (selected from a list). Across a range of academic domains, results revealed that students who believed that interest in an activity could be changed were more likely to report having used interest-enhancing strategies than students who believed that experiences of interest were stable.  These findings were also conceptually replicated across two experimental studies.  These meta-motivational beliefs are thus an important area of further study, because they will be influenced by parents and educators, and might help to explain why some students appear able to create or renew interest when hitting a motivational roadblock, while others do not.

Attributions for motivational roadblocks. Students beginning college often face motivational struggles with academic tasks that can be pivotal in determining their college experience. This project examines their beliefs about the role of interest as an explanation for these struggles. Helping students to “discern” interest is often an explicit goal of peer advising (NACE Staff, 2018); however, clarity about students’ attributional processes is needed in order to effectively provide them with the types of support that they may need. We (myself, Dustin Thoman and Debbie Deroma at SDSU, Danielle Geerling (now at St. Norbert’s College), Jasmine Norman and Yun Tang (Utah)) have begun a program of studies to systematically examine how college students think about interest and value as the cause of motivational challenges associated with performance on academic tasks. We work from the conceptual framework that embeds this process within social influences, including preconceptions about interests for people from particular groups and domains (Thoman et al., 2019). These social influences can affect whether the problem is attributed to interest, as well as the consequences of doing so. For example, interest can be developed (Renninger & Hidi, 2016), but students may not see that as an option for people from some groups or in certain domains.

To examine these questions, we developed an online paradigm in which participants are asked to read the profile of an hypothetical student and provide advice. They rate a set of potential attributions for why the student was having the problem, rate a variety of potential strategies to help with the problem, and indicate whether/how far the student should continue in the domain (continue classes in high school, in college and/or major in the field).To ensure good representation of students, we have been collecting data at two sites simultaneously (the University of Utah and San Diego State University), recruiting students who are at the beginning of their college career. Each study requires 500 participants, and we have completed 3 studies to date. (We were starting on a fourth study when the Covid19 pandemic occurred; this delayed our data collection process, and we have just begun data collection again.) 

We submitted a proposal to the Spencer Foundation to use this paradigm to clarify students’ theories about interest as a source of motivational problems by varying information about performance, the social identity of the target student, and whether they are describing their own (v. another’s) struggles. Although this proposal was unfunded, we are continuing to pursue these directions, and are extending the investigation to perceptions of hireability of potential job candidates. We expect to submit additional grant proposals to further the investigation of important parameters of these processes, as well as identify potential implications for applications. For example, insights can inform training practices for students who serve a variety of peer-support instructional roles, such as peer advisors, supplemental instruction staff, etc. Future study would be used to inform the design and testing of interventions that could be scaled beyond these initial institutions.

Presentations

  • Butner, J., & Sansone, C. (2014, January). Self-regulating Motivation and Performance Over Time. Presented at the Fred Rhodewalt Social Psychology Winter Conference, Park City, UT. , Presented, 2014.
  • What’s Interest Got to Do With It? Maintaining Motivation in STEM. Presented as part of invited session on “Exploring the Development of Interest”, 16th meeting of the National Academies of Science National Research Council Board on Science Education, December, 2011. , Presented, 2011.
  • Studying self-regulated learning: Going online. Invited for J. Cromley (Chair), Innovations in Researching STEM Teaching and Learning: Measures, Methods, and Data Analysis. National Science Foundation REESE PI meeting, Washington, D.C., March, 2010. , Presented, 2010.
  • What’s interest got to do with it?: Potential trade-offs in the self-regulation of motivation Invited for the 11th Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology on The Psychology of Self-Regulation, Sydney, Australia, March, 2008. , Presented, 2008.
  • Interest and Self-Regulation in Context. Invited for the international workshop on Motivation in Context. Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland, March, 2007. , Presented, 2007.
  • Curiosity and sustained engagement. Conference on Digital Empowerment: Engaging Learning in the 21st Century, Syracuse, NY, April, 2005. , Presented, 2005.
  • “Science is boring but Pokemon™ is cool”: The importance of interest in motivation. Invited for National Association of Gifted Children conference, Salt Lake City, UT, November, 2004. , Presented, 2004.
  • Sansone, C., Geerling, D., Smith, J.L. & Thoman, D.B. (April, 2019). Self-Regulation of Motivation: A Renewable Resource for Learning. In K.A. Renninger (chair), Synergies in Studies of Motivation and Learning: An Interactive Workshop. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Panel, Presented, 2019.
  • Sansone, C. (Chair). (2016, January) So You Want to Publish, Not Perish? Ask the Editors. Panel presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA. Panel, Presented, 2016.
  • Norman, J., Thoman, D. Geerling, D. & Sansone, C. (April, 2021). How Implicit Theories of Interest Regulation Shape College Major Recommendations Following Motivational Roadblocks. In D.B. Miele (Chair), Expanding the Role of Metamotivational Knowledge in Academic Self-Regulation. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, VIRTUAL MEETING. , Presented, 2021.
  • Geerling, D., Sansone, C., Thoman, D. & DeRoma, D. (April, 2020). Theories About the Role of Interest in Motivational Problems Differ by Social Identity and Domain. In C. Sansone (Chair), Exploring Processes That Underlie College Students’ Motivational Challenges. To be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Orlando, FL. CANCELLED DUE TO COVID. , Other, 2020.
  • Sansone, C. Geerling, D., Thoman, D.B., & Lee, G. (April, 2018). Interpreting motivational roadblocks: Attributions to interest as a function of gender and domain. In D.B. Miele (Chair), New Directions in Motivation Regulation: The role of students’ metamotivational beliefs. Symposium presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY. , Presented, 2018.
  • Sansone, C. & Fraughton, T. (September, 2017). Providing opportunities for exploratory engagement when learning online: Good for interest (but constrained by utility value). In L Fryer & N. Dohn (Chairs), Stimulating and Sustaining Interest: The profits and pitfalls of technology in education. Symposium presented at the biannual meeting of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction, Tampere, Finland. , Presented, 2017.
  • Sansone, C. & Butner, J. (May, 2016) Regulating motivation over time: How does interest matter? In D.B. Miele & A.A. Scholer (Chairs), Exploring Psychological Flexibility across Multiple Domains. Annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago, IL. , Presented, 2016.
  • Sansone, C., Sinclair, S., Fraughton, T., Zachary, J., & Butner, J. (April, 2016). Adding value to motivate engagement: The role of individual interest. In K. Ann Renninger (Chair), The Roles of Value and Interest in Promoting Learning. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Washington, D.C. , Presented, 2016.
  • Thoman, D.B., & Sansone, C. (2015, April). Undergraduates’ implicit theories of interest regulation. In C. Sansone (chair), On Creating and Maintaining the Experience of Interest. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL. , Presented, 2015.
  • Sansone, C., Sinclair, S., Fraughton, T.A., Butner, J., & Zachary, J. (2014, April). Distinguishing Interest, Engagement and Achievement: An Online Learning Approach. In S. Hidi (chair), Current approaches to Interest Measurement. Structured poster session at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, PA. , Presented, 2014.
  • Sansone, C., Sinclair, S., Fraughton, T., Butner, J., & Zachary, J. (2013, August). Self-regulating Interest and Learning Over Time: Adding Performance Concerns. In D. Lewalter & K.A. Renninger (chairs), Processes and Outcomes in Interest Research: A Panel. Symposium at the biannual meeting of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction, Munich, Germany. , Presented, 2013.
  • Sansone, C. (April, 2012). The reciprocal relationship between value, interest, and learning over time. In K.A. Renninge (Chair), Interest Development and Its Relation to Academic Motivation. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, BC. , Presented, 2012.
  • Sansone, C., Butner, J., Zachary, J., Fraughton, T., & Ripley, S. (2011, September). Regulating the interest experience over time: The role of utility value, on-task, and off-task behaviors. In B. Spinath (chair), What Explains the Development of Interest and Intrinsic Motivation for Learning? Symposium presented at the biannual meeting of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction, Exeter, UK. , Presented, 2011.
  • Sansone, C., Fraughton, T., Butner, J., Zachary, J. & Sinclair, S. (2011, September). Self-regulating Learning: The Relationships of Utility Value, Competence Value and Lesson Value to Interest and Learning. In K.A. Renninger (chair), Competence, Value, Achievement, and Interest: How Are They Related in Academic Motivation? Symposium at the biannual meeting of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction, Exeter, UK. , Presented, 2011.
  • Sansone, C., Butner, J., Fraughton, T.B., & Zachary, J.L. (2011, April) Self-regulatory Trade-offs When Learning Online: Interested Engagement Can Hurt AND Help. In P. O'Keefe & I. Plante (chairs), Developments in Interest Theory and Research. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. , Presented, 2011.
  • Fraughton, T., Sansone, C., Butner, J. & Zachary, J. (2011, January). Fully engaged: Creating an interesting experience for those with low efficacy. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Antonio, TX. , Presented, 2011.
  • Sansone, C., Fraughton, T.B., Zachary, J.L., Heiner, C., & Butner, J. (2010, May). Interest, engagement and learning over time: Making it personal. In K. Ann Renninger (chair), Interest, Engagement, and Learning: Implications for STEM. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Denver, CO. , Other, 2010.
  • Sansone, C., Zachary, J.L., Fraughton, T.B., Heiner, C., & Butner, J. (2010, May). Initial orientations, interest and online learning: What students do is as important as why. In K. Ann Renninger (chair), Studying Motivation and Learning Online: Prospects and Challenges. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Denver, CO. , Other, 2010.
  • Fraughton, T.B., Sansone, C., Thoman, D.B., Butner, J., Zachary, J., & Thompson, W. (2010, January). Differences in task engagement as a function of self-control: Why those higher in self control might be better at regulating potential trade-offs between interest and performance. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Las Vegas, NV. , Presented, 2010.
  • Thoman, D.B., Sansone, C., Pasupathi, M., & Arizaga, J. (2010, January). How conversation partners affect the development of students’ interest and motivation. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Las Vegas, NV. , Presented, 2010.
  • Fraughton, T.B., Thoman, D.B., Karino, W., & Sansone, C. (2009, February). Listener responsiveness, interpersonal orientation and activity interest in an online context. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Tampa, FL. , Presented, 2009.
  • Sansone, C., Fraughton, T.B., Thoman, D.B., Zachary, J., Thompson, W.B. (2009, May). Characteristic differences in self-control predict potential trade-offs between regulating interest and performance. Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco, CA. , Presented, 2009.
  • Thoman, D. B. & Sansone, C. (2007, January). The social nature of ‘intrinsic’ motivation: How talking with others affects interest development. In Jessi L. Smith (chair), What’s My (Intrinsic) Motivation? The Social Psychology of Interest. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Knoxville, TN. , Presented, 2007.
  • Thoman, D.B., & Sansone, C. (2006, January). Implications of Discriminatory Feedback for Activity Interest and Choice. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Palm Spring, CA. , Presented, 2006.
  • Thoman, D.B. & Sansone, C. (2004, May). How perceived discriminatory feedback decreases interest and motivation. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Society, Chicago, IL. , Presented, 2004.
  • Sansone, C., Smith, J.L., & Thoman, D. (2003, August). Regulating interest and motivation In an online versus an on-campus class. In Sanna Järvelä (Chair), Interest and motivation for computer-based learning. Symposium presented at the 10th Biennial Meeting of the European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction, Padova, Italy. , Presented, 2003.
  • Smith, J.L., & Sansone, C. (2001, February).Making the online link to other people: Motivational consequences. Paper presented at the 2nd annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Antonio, TX. , Presented, 2001.
  • Livsey, S., Werner, C.M., Sansone, C., McVaugh, N. & Smith, J.L. (2000, June). Encouraging nature friendly gardening: Strategies that combine persuasion and behavioral self-regulation. Paper presented at the 8th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management. Bellingham, WA. , Presented, 2000.
  • Werner, C.M., Sansone, C., Livsey, S., McVaugh, N. & Smith, J.L. (2000, June). Changing environmental behaviors: Inspiration from persuasion and behavioral self-regulation research. Paper presentation at the 8th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management. Bellingham, WA. , Presented, 2000.
  • Sinclair, S., Butner, J. Sansone, C. & Zachary, J. (2014, February). How Do Students Manage Interest While Working Online through Temporal Patterns of Off-Task Behavior? Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, TX. Poster, Presented, 2014.
  • Kent, R., Fraughton, T., Sinclair, S., & Sansone, C. (January, 2012). Engagement When Learning Online: Information About Utility Value Can Aid Students With Learning Goals. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA. Poster, Presented, 2012.
  • Fraughton, T., Sansone, C., Butner, J., & Zachary, J. (January, 2012). Interest And Performance When Learning Online: Providing Utility Value Information Can Be Important For Both Novice And Experienced Students. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA. Poster, Presented, 2012.

Grants, Contracts & Research Gifts

  • COMPANION TO 58501381. PI: - 2012. Total project budget to date:
  • INCREASING STUDENT MOTIVATION. PI: - 2011. Total project budget to date: