Current Courses

Spring 2023

  • ECS 2150-001
    Intro Multicultural Ed
    Location: CRCC 210 (CRCC 210)
  • ECS 2150-002
    Intro Multicultural Ed
    Location: SAEC 3155 (SAEC 3155)
  • ECS 2150-003
    Intro Multicultural Ed
    Location: SAEC 2155 (SAEC 2155)
  • ECS 5709-001
    Family School Partner
    Location: SAEC 3155 (SAEC 3155)
  • ECS 6632-001
    Research Multicult. Ed
    Location: CRCC 210 (CRCC 210)
  • ECS 6709-001
    Family School Partner
    Location: SAEC 3155 (SAEC 3155)
  • ECS 6832-001
    Refugee Education
    Location: SAEC 2147 (SAEC 2147)
  • ECS 6950-003
    Spec Topics in Ed
    Location: SAEC 2147 (SAEC 2147)
  • ECS 7832-001
    Refugee Education
    Location: SAEC 2147 (SAEC 2147)
  • ECS 7871-001
    Qual Research Methods
    Location: SAEC 1213 (SAEC 1213)
  • ECS 7899-001
    TA Seminar
    Location: SAEC 3151 (SAEC 3151)
  • ECS 7950-003
    Special Topics in Ed
    Location: SAEC 2147 (SAEC 2147)

Fall 2022

Summer 2022

Professional Organizations

  • American Educational Studies Association (AESA). 09/2015 - present. Position : Member.
  • National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME). 03/2015 - present. Position : Member.
  • National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies (NACCS). 09/2014 - present. Position : Member.
  • Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social (MALCS). 05/2008 - present. Position : Member.
  • American Education Research Association (AERA). 09/2002 - present. Position : Member.

Teaching Philosophy

My teaching philosophy emerges from over 30 years of diverse teaching experiences as a university, public school and summer collegiate teacher with both middle and high school students and community organizing. I believe in teaching that raises social, cultural and political consciousness and that deals directly with bridging theory with practice through community engagement. The foundation of my teaching philosophy rests on providing students a lens from which to comprehend and dismantle hegemonic structures in schools, and society.

Core to my teaching activities is attending to different learning methods, interactive styles, and modes of communication by which students express their knowledge. More specifically, I create opportunities to discuss disparate positions by engaging in critical dialogues that are supported by research. This approach underscores my conviction that learning is situational and that individuals bring their funds of knowledge (González, Moll, & Amanti, 2005) to educational contexts. Core to my teaching is attending to students’ different learning methods, interactive styles, and modes of communication. Therefore, I integrate mixed media approaches that combine popular culture (i.e., film, literature, performance, music), academic scholarship, empirical research, writing, and group projects in my pedagogy. These pedagogical approaches generate dialogue and promote self–reflection as a valuable source of learning.

 

Courses I Teach

  • ECS 2150 - Introduction to Multicultural Education
    History, concepts, and theoretical base for multicultural education. Models and strategies for teaching minority students as well as effective curriculum material. Creating a classroom climate for acceptance of differences--cultural, linguistic, genetic, disabling. Prerequisite to early childhood, elementary, and secondary teacher certification programs.
  • ECS 5709/6709 - Family School Partnerships
    The course is designed as a service-learning course to acquaint learners with the necessary background for effective development and application of partnerships between families, schools and communities. Emphasis is on continuous partnership efforts and understandings of contexts and ethics when working with linguistically and culturally diverse families, schools and communities. Requires 37 hours of school/community-based service learning hours. Students enrolled in 6709 will be expected to meet a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional assignments.
  • ECS 5715/6715 - Urban Education
    Course is designed to enhance students' knowledge of urban schooling through the examination of historical, social, economic, political, and socio-cultural frameworks with an emphasis on issues of race and class as they have affected the distribution of equal educational opportunities in urban education. This course will examine pedagogies and programs that have demonstrated success with urban students and investigate the complexity and challenge of providing excellent education in urban schools. Students enrolled in 6715 will be expected to meet a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional assignments.
  • ECS 5960 - Undergraduate Research
    Independent in-depth project under direction of faculty. Includes field work.
  • ECS 6600 - Intro. Critical/Cultural Studies in Education
    Examines the social, political, and economic context of schooling with an emphasis on historical and current problems, conflicts, and movements in education.
  • ECS 6820/7820 - Juvenile (IN)Justice & Education
    The school-to-prison pipeline is an epidemic that is plaguing schools across the nation. A central aim of this graduate seminar is to critically examine the theoretical underpinnings that promote the school to prison pipeline and how it impacts young people’s lives both nationally and locally. In order to theoretically and conceptually understand why and how zero tolerance policies disproportionately target minoritized students, this seminar traces historical racial caste systems, and political and theoretical roots that provide the backdrop of such policies.
  • ECS 6823/7823 - Immigration & Education
    The school-to-prison pipeline is an epidemic that is plaguing schools across the nation. A central aim of this graduate seminar is to critically examine the theoretical underpinnings that promote the school to prison pipeline and how it impacts young people’s lives both nationally and locally. In order to theoretically and conceptually understand why and how zero tolerance policies disproportionately target minoritized students, this seminar traces historical racial caste systems, and political and theoretical roots that provide the backdrop of such policies.
  • ECS 6826/7826 - Youth & Action Research
    This graduate seminar offers an in-depth exploration of theoretical, methodological, and practical issues in the design and implementation of Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR), and activist scholarship as well as the issues faced by researchers using this qualitative method. Through interdisciplinary scholarship as well as the issues faced by researchers using this qualitative method. Through interdisciplinary instruction the professor will engage the participants in readings across academic disciplines (i.e., sociology, cultural studies, gender studies, and anthropology) and simultaneously explore, reflect, and identify YPAR with youth and trouble methodological debates and research positions that frame youth and action research. In this capacity, the class discusses how youth (past and present) produce knowledge that informs what is popular culture, citizenship, art, politics, and identity while resisting mainstream representations that have constructed them as other (i.e., undocumented, gang member, teen mother, thief, drug dealer, terrorist, etc.). The course will be taught in the spirit of PAR, therefore learning will be a process of mutual exchange.
  • ECS 6833/7833 - Latinxs & Education
    This course examines the socio-historical, cultural and political contexts that structure the educational experiences of Latin@s in the U.S.; particular attention will be given to issues of cultural identity and representation as they affect the education of Latin@s. The course begins with a critical look at how Latin@ students have been socially constructed and moves toward a greater understanding of the policy, political, social, and economic forces shaping Latin@s' education. Essential inquiries we will explore: How do cultural constructions of Latin@s (immigrants & natives, regardless of immigration status) shape educational policy, programs and teaching practices for Latin@ students? What views of citizenship and identity underlie various educational programs and the response of Latin@s to these programs? Latin@ communities have a long history of demonstrations, organizing and activism around education, and their organizing efforts have been met with vicious opposition from mainstream individuals and policymakers. Examining organizing efforts, as well as other less observable forms of resistance to assimiliationist educational policies, we will explore: How have cultural identities and claims to cultural and educational rights shaped Latin@s' educational engagement? What new directions in research and practice are needed? In addition, we will explore transnationalism, or the social processes through which immigrants link their countries of origin with their communities in the U.S., and implications for the education of Latin@s. How do transnational cultural frames shape Latin@ immigrants' views, expectations, and experiences of the U.S. educational system? How do Latin@s cultivate new practices of engagement and resistance in the educational system?

Current Students

Former Students

  • Analis Carattini-Ruiz, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Member.
  • Ana C. Antunes, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Chair.
  • Hyesun Kim, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Member.
  • Barbara Kessel, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Member.
  • Jennyffer Morales, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Member.
  • Delila Omerbašić, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Member.
  • Trevor Warburton, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Dissertation. Role: Member.
  • Juan Freire, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Project Type: Other. Role: Member.