TASHA SENECA KEYES portrait
  • Assistant Professor, College Of Social Work

Research Keywords

  • Underrepresented students and communities with special interest in Native American populations
  • Transition to High School and College
  • Student-teacher relationships
  • Student, teacher and parent experiences of education
  • Social Emotional Learning
  • School Social Work K-12
  • Noncognitive Factors
  • Classroom Belonging and Engagement

Presentations

  • Keyes, T.S. A Qualitative Inquiry: Factors that Promote Classroom Belonging and Engagement with High School Students. Research Paper presented at the 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry; May 17-20, 2017; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Conference Paper, Presented, 05/18/2017.
    http://icqi.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/QI2017-...
  • Brooks, M., Keyes, T.S., Day, B.J. Supporting Students by Understanding the Unique Contributions of School Social Workers, School Psychologists, and School Counselors (updated data analysis). Poster session presented at: Rocky Mountain Psychological Annual Convention, April 6-8, 2017; Salt Lake City, UT. Poster, Presented, 04/06/2017.
    http://www.rockymountainpsych.com/program/
  • Keyes, T.S. Promoting Classroom Belonging and Engagement with High School Students. Poster presentation at Society for Social Work and Research 2017 Annual Conference; January 11-15, 2017; New Orleans, LO. Poster, Presented, 01/13/2017.
  • Keyes, T.S. and Day, B.J. Noncognitive factors: Do students learning strategies and academic behaviors develop in high school transition to college? Research Paper presented at the Association for the Study of Higher Education 2015 Annual Conference; November 5-7, 2015; Denver, CO. Conference Paper, Presented, 11/06/2015.
  • Day, B.J., Keyes, T.S., Proger, A.R., Clark, K., Roderick, M. Inside the Black Box of College Match: The Academic, Social, and Institutional Experiences of High-Achieving, Urban High School Graduates in College. Research Paper presented at the Association for the Study of Higher Education 2015 Annual Conference; November 5-7, 2015; Denver, CO. Conference Paper, Presented, 11/06/2015.
  • Keyes, T.S. and Day, B.J. Turf War? Supporting Students by Understanding the Unique Contributions of School Social Workers, School Counselors and School Psychologists. Poster session presented at 18th National School Social Work Conference April 14-18, 2015; Nashville, TN. Poster, Presented, 04/15/2015.
  • Beechum, N., Keyes, T.S., Day, B.J. How do students adapt their academic behaviors and learning strategies in the transition from high school to college? Poster session presented at: Society for Research on Adolescence- 15th Biennial Meeting; 2014 March 20-22; Austin, TX. Poster, Presented, 03/2014.

Languages

  • English, fluent.

Publications

  • Research has shown that in addition to academic knowledge, a variety of noncognitive skills are essential to students' post-secondary success. This article summarizes a review by the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) that brought together hundreds of studies of factors that have been tied to academic success into a coherent framework of noncognitive factors (Farrington et al. 2012). The review paid close attention to identifying which noncognitive factors matter for students' long-term success, clarifying why and how these factors matter, and determining if these factors are malleable and responsive to context and how they are related to each other. The goal of the literature review was to develop a coherent and evidence-based framework for considering the role of noncognitive factors in increasing student attainment and to identify critical gaps in the knowledge base and in the link between research and practice. Parts of that review are excerpted here. Accepted, 09/02/2013.
    https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1046369
  • President Obama's first address to Congress signaled a shift in educational priorities. He committed his administration to ending the dropout crisis in the nation's public high schools and ensuring that by 2020 America would once again lead the world in the proportion of its population with college degrees. What has not been talked about is that a shift to making high school and college completion the national educational goal requires a corresponding shift in educational policy and practice, "away from a focus on test scores" and toward a new emphasis on developing the cognitive and noncognitive factors that lead students to earn high course grades. The emerging recognition of the importance of noncognitive factors to young people's long-term success raises new challenges for teachers seeking to prepare their students for college and careers. To make this shift, educators need to understand how best to help adolescents develop as learners in their classes. By helping students develop the noncognitive skills, strategies, attitudes, and behaviors that are the hallmarks of effective learners, teachers can improve student learning and course performance while also increasing the likelihood that students will be successful in college. This report grew out of the understanding that it is not enough to know that noncognitive factors matter for learning. Researchers from a range of disciplines have provided evidence that such factors are important to students' grades and long-term educational outcomes. However, little work has been done to bring clarity to this wide-ranging evidence, to examine its relevance for practice, or to review actionable strategies for classroom use. The authors' goal was to develop a coherent and evidence-based framework for considering the role of noncognitive factors in academic performance. They conclude by summarizing the most promising levers for change as well as critical gaps in the knowledge base and in the link between research and practice. Appendix: Educational Attainment by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity is Driven by Differences in GPA is included. (Contains 5 figures, 1 table, 3 boxes, and 12 endnotes.) [Additional funding for this paper was provided by the Raikes Foundation.]. Released, 06/11/2012.
    https://consortium.uchicago.edu/sites/default/file...