CHRISTINE A JONES

Biosketch

CHRISTINE A JONES portrait
  • Associate Professor, World Languages and Cultures, University of Utah

Publications

Publications

  • An Edible World: Hot Beverages, Orientalism, and the French Enlightenment (in progress) Seventeenth-century Europeans believed coffee, chocolate, and tea—exotic “drugs”—could heal or poison. A century later, they were culinary staples. Hot beverages are understudied accessories to sociability and ciphers through which France explored, understood, and global culture in the wake of early diplomatic and mercantile expeditions. An Edible World takes up the print reception history of coffee, chocolate and tea to show that these three drinks changed the way Europe imagined the rest of the world. In progress, 02/2013.
  • Mother Goose Revisited. Trans. and Ed. Christine A. Jones. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, forthcoming in 2015. In press, 11/01/2015.
  • Shapely Bodies: The Image of Porcelain in Eighteenth-Century France. Studies in 17th- and 18th- Century Art and Culture. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2013. Shapely Bodies is the first book that explores the cultural significance of porcelain as an artisanal craft, and artisans as makers of fashion trends, during the one hundred years of its experimental development in France, c. 1660-1760. Published, 05/2013.
    http://www.amazon.com/Shapely-Bodies-Eighteenth-Ce...
  • Marvelous Transformations: An Anthology of Tales and New Critical Perspectives. Eds. Christine A. Jones and Jennifer Schacker. Broadview Press, 2012. Published, 10/19/2012.
    http://www.broadviewpress.com/product.php?producti...
  • Several translations in Fairy Tales Framed: Early Forewords, Afterwords, and Critical Words. Ed. Ruth B. Bottigheimer. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 2012. Charles Perrault, “‘Griselda’, Letter to Monsieur” (1695) ---. “‘Donkeyskin. Tale.’, Letter to Madame La Marquise de L…” (1695) ---. “‘The Ridiculous Wishes. Tale.’, Letter to Mademoiselle de La C…” (1695) ---. “Tales of My Mother Goose, Dedicatory Letter to Mademoiselle” (1695). Published, 05/2012.
  • Feathers, Paws, Fins, and Claws: The Extraordinary Animals of Folk and Fairy Tales. Eds. Jennifer Schacker and Christine A. Jones. Wayne State University Press, Series in Fairy Tale Studies. In press, 02/2015.
  • The History of the Fairy Tale, eds. Christine A. Jones and Jennifer Schacker. Proposal solicited by Palgrave MacMillan. In progress, 02/2015.
  • “Caution, Contents May Be Hot: A Cultural Anatomy of the Tasse Trembleuse.” In Eighteenth-Century Thing Theory in a Global Context: From Consumerism to Celebrity Culture. Eds. Christina Ionescu and Ileana Baird. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2013. Published, 12/2013.
  • “Edible Craft: Coffee, Tea, Chocolate, and the Early Modern French How-to." Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Medieval and Early Modern Artisan Culture, eds. Nicole Rice and Margaret Pappano 43.3 (2013): 623-653. Published, 09/2013.
  • “Thoughts on ‘Heroinism’ in French Fairy Tales.” Marvels & Tales: Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies 27.1 (2013): 15-33. Published, 06/2013.
  • “Embodied Culture, Living History: Teaching French Theater as Performance Art.” Dramatic Interactions: Teaching Literature, Culture, and Language through Theater. Ed. Colleen Ryan-Sheutz and Nicoletta Marini-Maio. Oxford: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011. Published, 01/2011.
  • “The Hidden Life of Porcelainiers in Eighteenth-Century France.” Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Special Issue: “Trades” 23.2 (Winter 2010-11) 381-408. Published, 10/2010.
  • “Madame d’Aulnoy Charms the British.” The Romanic Review 99.2 (2009): 239-256. Published, 09/2009.
  • "Louisiana Fairy Tales: Lessons in Naion-buiding and the Politics of Language." Teaching Fairy Tales. Wayne State University Press. Submitted, 02/2015.
  • “The Significance of Translation.” Approaches to Teaching the Fairy Tale. Eds. Claudia Schwabe and Christa Jones. Utah State University Press, expected 2015. In press, 12/2014.
  • "When Chocolate was Medicine: Colmenero, Wadsworth, and Dufour." Public Domain Review 28 January 2015. Published, 01/28/2015.
    http://publicdomainreview.org/2015/01/28/when-choc...
  • "Mother Goose's French Birth (1697) and British Afterlife (1729)." Public Domain Review 29 May 2013. Published, 05/29/2013.
    http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/05/29/mother-go...
  • “Material Culture.” The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales & Fairy Tales. 2nd Edition. Eds. Donald Haase and Anne Duggan. Westport: Greenwood, forthcoming 2014. Submitted, 12/2013.
  • “Maiden Warrior.” The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales & Fairy Tales. 2nd Edition. Eds. Donald Haase and Anne Duggan. Westport: Greenwood Publications, forthcoming 2014. Submitted, 10/2013.
  • “Cross-dressing.” Encyclopedia of Folktales and Fairy Tales. Westport: Greenwood Publications. Other, 2008.
  • “L’Héritier, Marie-Jeanne.” Encyclopedia of Folktales and Fairy Tales. Westport: Greenwood Publications. Other, 2008.
  • Patricia Eichel-Lojkine, Contes en réseaux: l’émergence du conte sur la scène littéraire européenne (Geneva : Droz, 2013). In The French Review 88.3 (2015): 210. Published, 09/2015.
  • Review of Jack Zipes, The Irresistible Fairy Tale: The Cultural and Social History of a Genre (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012). In The Times Higher Education No. 2,047 (26 Apr. 2012): 51. Published, 06/2012.
    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?st...
  • Review of Enchanted Eloquence: Fairy Tales by Seventeenth-Century French Women Writers. Eds. Lewis Seifert and Domna C. Stanton (Toronto: Iter/Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2010). In Renaissance Quarterly 64.3 (2011): 945-46. Published, 07/2011.
  • Review of “Imperial Privilege: Vienna Porcelain of Du Paquier, 1718-44,” Metropolitan Museum of Art (Oct. 2009-21 Mar. 2010). Published, 02/2010.
    http://www.curatedobject.us/the_curated_object_/ex...
  • Review of Féeries 4 (2007): Le Conte, La Scène. Ed. Jean-François Perrin. In Eighteenth-Century Fiction 2.1 (2009). Published, 08/2009.
  • Tales of a Louisiana Grandmother by Sidonie de la Houssaye. Trans. and ed. Christine A. Jones. Best known to the Anglophone world for her trilogy, Les Quarteronnes de la Nouvelle-Orléans (The New Orleans Quadroons), Sidonie de la Houssaye wrote tales in the post-war 1870s for a generation of Francophone children poised to lose their language and its cultural past to English hegemony in North America. This annotated volume and critical introduction will render the remarkable multilingual sensibility of her prose readable by an American public that she predicted, due to post-Civil War Anglophone hegemony in North America, would irrevocably lose access to it. In progress, 01/2016.
  • “Marvelous Illustration: The Art of Depicting Fairy Tales,” In Eighteenth-Century Book Illustration Reader. Eds. Christina Ionescu and Leigh G. Dillard. Due Dec. 2016. Accepted, 03/16/2015.
  • “French Versions of Subversion: Then and Now,” with response from Jack Zipes. The Folklore Historian 30 (2013): 31-44. [panel published at request of editor.]. Published, 05/01/2013.