Current Courses

Fall 2020

  • FRNCH 3910-001
    Special Topics
    Location: CANVAS (CANVAS)
  • FRNCH 4600-001
    Intro Lit Analysis
    Location: CANVAS (CANVAS)
  • FRNCH 6900-002
    Special Topics

Spring 2020

Courses I Teach

  • Clcs 6900 - The Medieval Self
    This course will explore strategies for conceiving and presenting the self in a much earlier period, mainly the thirteenth century. We will ask what this earlier period thought of when it turned inward and then especially how it conceived of that subject, object, idea when it turned outward and tried to present it to others. In order to focus this broad project we will look carefully at one story, the legend of Theophilus, and many of the versions of this story in texts, manuscript images, sculpture, and stained glass.
  • Clcs 6900 - The Medieval Self
    This course will explore strategies for conceiving and presenting the self in a much earlier period, mainly the thirteenth century. We will ask what this earlier period thought of when it turned inward and then especially how it conceived of that subject, object, idea when it turned outward and tried to present it to others. In order to focus this broad project we will look carefully at one story, the legend of Theophilus, and many of the versions of this story in texts, manuscript images, sculpture, and stained glass.
  • F 3800 - French Literature
    The aim of this course is to give students of all majors a chance to experience a selection of classic, great books from the French tradition. These are the kinds of titles one sees references to in and outside of the humanities, books you know you should have read but might not have had the chance to read, books it would be a challenge to take on in French. Other than following a historical chronology they are not related thematically. We will however talk about how each book and period negotiates the relation between the individual author and the larger society, between the present and the past, and between the voice of the text and the larger French tradition. The class will focus on prose narrative, from medieval [the great love story of Lancelot and Guenievre and Perceval’s mysterious quest for the Grail] and renaissance [Gargantua’s hyperbolic appetite – for food and knowledge] romance to the rise of the novel [Lafayette and Diderot] and realism [Balzac and Flaubert] to Proust’s and Duras’ stream of consciousness. The course will be run more like a book group than a lecture class. A fair amount of reading and lots of discussion will be required.

Teaching Projects

  • Honors/Humanities Research Professorship. Project Lead: Jerry Root. Honors College and College of Humanities 05/01/2016 - 07/01/2017.

Small Group Teaching

  • Honors/Humanities Research Professorship.  05/01/2016  -  07/01/2017