PAUL G. CASSELL

Curriculum Vitae

PAUL G. CASSELL portrait
  • Ronald N. Boyce Presidential Professor of Criminal Law, College Of Law, University of Utah
  • Professor, College Of Law, University of Utah

Biography

Education

  • B.A. 1981, Economics, Stanford University
  • J.D. 1984, Stanford Law School, Stanford University

Honors & Awards

  • Faculty Achievement Award for Research Excellence. University of Utah College of Law, 05/2014
  • Paul M. Bator Award (for outstanding young law professor in the country). Federalist Society, 06/1998
  • Faculty Achievement Award for Teaching Excellence. University of Utah College of Law , 05/1997
  • Order of the Coif. Stanford Law School, 06/1984
  • President. Stanford Law Review, 03/1983

Biography

Paul G. Cassell received a B.A. (1981) and a J.D. (1984) from Stanford University, where he graduated Order of the Coif and was President of the Stanford Law Review. He clerked for then-Judge Antonin Scalia when Scalia was on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (1984-85) and then for the Chief Justice of the United States, Warren Burger (1985-86). Cassell then served as an Associate Deputy Attorney General with the U.S. Justice Department (1986-88) and as an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia (1988 to 1991). Cassell joined the faculty at the College of Law in 1992, where he taught full time until he was sworn in as a U.S. District Court Judge for the District of Utah on July 2, 2002. In November 2007, he resigned his judgeship to return full time to the College of Law, to teach, write, and litigate on issues relating to crime victims' rights and criminal justice reform.

Professor Cassell teaches criminal procedure, crime victims' rights, criminal law, and related classes.

Affiliations

  • Utah Council on Victims of Crime, Special Counsel, 01/2014 - present
  • National Crime Victims Law Institute, Special Counsel, 06/2008 - present
  • Utah Bar, Member, 05/1992 - present

In the Media

  • Professor Cassell is frequently quoted in major media on criminal justice issues, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the L.A. Times, Sixty Minutes, and other sources. 12/2007.